Tag Archives: basil

Roasted Tomato Soup

Roast tomato soup.

Roast tomato soup.

Sunday I received a very unexpected gift from my friend.  While sitting through my son’s baseball double header, my friend arrived baring a special treat only available around this time of year- fresh, just picked tomatoes!  Oh, I was so excited!  And even thought it was 90 degrees, I knew right away with the coming weather change in the Northwest, that Roasted Tomato Soup was on the menu in our house.

Tomatoes being washed.

Tomatoes being washed.

After washing the tomatoes, I got ready to slice them into rough chunks.  Once cut, I laid them out on two cooking trays, drizzled them with olive oil and sprinkled them with a dried Italian herb blend which included marjoram, thyme, rosemary, sage, oregano and basil.  (You could use whichever herbs you have on hand.)

Tomatoes waiting to be cut up for roasting.

Tomatoes waiting to be cut up for roasting.

I am going to warn you before you get to the recipe that this was a bit of a wing it attempt at soup.  I didn’t measure anything but just went with my gut- so I apologize! (But isn’t that part of the joy of cooking?  You get to be creative and  it brings you pleasure and nourishes your body!)

As you can see from the picture below, I also add a sliced onion and some garlic cloves to the roasting pan.  (These were so good right out of the oven that I had a hard time saving them for the soup!)  Be sure to scrape all the roasted bits of tomato seeds, garlic, onion and oil into the pot.  You don’t want to miss any of the roasted goodness!

Tomatoes after roasting in the oven.

Tomatoes after roasting in the oven.

I used bone broth for my liquid in this soup because I had some in my freezer.  You could use any type of broth- veggie or meat- that you have available.

I used an immersion blender to puree my soup but if you don’t have one a regular blender or food processor works great- just be sure not to over fill the appliance.

Soup ready to be eaten.

Soup ready to be eaten.

Roasted Tomato Soup

Ingredients

  • Roughly two lbs of tomatoes
  • Roughly 2 cups of broth (I used bone broth but veggie or chicken broth would also work.)
  • 1 onion
  • 7 cloves of garlic
  • Olive oil
  • Dried Italian herb blend
  • Salt and pepper
  • Fresh basil

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Cut up onions, tomatoes and garlic.
  3. Place on roasting pan.
  4. Drizzle with olive oil
  5. Sprinkle with Italian herbs and salt and pepper.
  6. Place in the oven and roast for approximately 30 minutes .
  7. Remove from the oven when tomatoes are wilted and soft. (You can even let them brown a bit.)
  8. Place tomatoes, onions and garlic in a pot on the stove.
  9. Add broth.
  10. Let cook about 15 minutes to allow flavors to meld.
  11. Using an immersion blender, puree the tomatoes.
  12. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  13. Mix in a little finely chopped fresh basil.
  14. Serve and enjoy!
https://www.nourishedrootspdx.com/blog/roasted-tomato-soup/

This soup was so easy and I loved that it was made with a gift from a friend!  There is something so satisfying about using ingredients that are given to you in friendship!

Enjoy!

This post was added to She Eats and Gluten Free Homemaker.

Seasonally Appropriate Hydration

Ideas to flavor your water.

Ideas to flavor your water.

Last week, my school hosted a community health fair.   Each student was asked to choose a topic related to the bountiful harvest of summer.  There were incredibly informative tables about fermentation, sprouting, the importance of eating greens and hormone balancing through food.  A colleague and I chose to make our booth about the importance of hydration.  My booth partner, Stephanie Rider, provided a great short primer for ways to add tasty, seasonally appropriate hydration to your day.  I thought I would share it with my readers. (You can see my part of the handout here.)   Enjoy!

Basil, cucumber, orange water.

Basil, cucumber, orange water.

Adding Hydration into your Day
Adding vegetables and fruits such as those listed below will enhance
your intake of water.
Vegetables: Broccoli, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Cucumber,
Green Peppers, Iceberg Lettuce, Spinach, Tomatoes
Fruits: Blackberries, Blueberries, Cantaloupe, Grapefruit,
Raspberries, Strawberries, Watermelon
The best way to ensure adequate hydration is to include water in your
daily routine. How can you make hydration fun? Adding fresh fruits,
vegetables and herbs to your water can provide both eye-catching
appeal and subtle flavoring.

There are many great, natural ingredients you can add to your water
to infuse color and flavor.
As you add these ingredients, you also get the benefit of the vitamins
and minerals contained in those foods.
Wholistic nutrition also recognizes the energetic and healing properties
of foods and herbs, and selecting the right ones based on the time of
year will support natural nourishment.
Summer: Cooling
Summer is a great time to look to foods that have a cooling effect on
the body to help stay regulated in the heat of the summer.
Such food/herb combinations are:
Cucumber, Orange and Basil
Dandelion leaf
Lemon and Lavender
Peaches and Chamomile
Pineapple and Green Tea
Berries: (black, blue, raspberry) and Mint
Watermelon and Mint

Fall: Grounding
Fall is a great time to add grounding foods to your diet. This reflects
the natural cycle of nature by supporting the need to ground and
prepare for winter months, drawing energy into your core.
Great fall seasonal flavors to use are:
Cilantro and Citrus peel
Fennel
Apricot and Goji Berries
Kumquat and Rosemary
Pomegranate
Pineapple and Ginger
Winter: Warming, Immunity Boosting
Winter is a time to stay hydrated, as the dryness of the air can
dehydrate just as much as summertime heat. Additionally, infusing
your liquids with warming foods and herbs will deeply warm you from
the inside out. It is also a great time to boost your immunities against

colds and flu. Consider warm/hot water infusions, herbal teas as well
as broths for hydration.
Winter concoctions can include:
Kumquat and Basil
Citrus peel
Black tea and Ginger
Cinnamon, Clove and Honey
When you are fighting a cold or virus:
Fresh Ginger (not dried) tea
Onion and Rosemary/Parsley broth
Miso broth

Spring: Uplifting
Springtime is a time of rebirth. Consider these “first harvest” fruits,
vegetables and herbs to bring that uplifting nourishment to your body
as you prepare for this cycle of nature.
Springtime harvest infusions can include:
Apricot
Cherry and Lime
Pineapple and Ginger
Strawberries and Rose Petals
Cucumbers and Basil
Lavender and Lemon

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